About

project

KKA-098-IGH-2024

Location

Hamburg, Germany

Project Status

Idea competition

Main Use

Residential

Year

2024

As part of an ideas competition for floor plans for a linear building block with a north-south orientation, a strong basic structure was proposed that is easy to build and transferable to other projects. On the one hand, it should be modular and consist of only a few elements in order to enable a high degree of economical prefabrication and, on the other hand, characterise the building in its spatial structure and character while offering as much flexibility as possible. The aim is not only to build economically, but also to create a durable building that can be adapted to shifting needs: a serial production with individuality and the ability to change.

The repetitive structure consists of columns with a square cross-section and L-shaped walls. The formation of the L-shaped walls supports the floor plan layout, which is orientated radially from the central access to all facades. On the one hand, the L-shaped walls feature a neutral uniformity across the entire floor plan, but at the same time stimulate the characteristic spatial structure. They are a space-defining element that unites the load-bearing structure, pipework and interior finishing. With just two different opening widths, the basic structure can be flexibly finished and changed into different room sequences.

The open staircase on the north side of the building forms a balcony area on the landings, alternating left and right, which can be used by all residents as an additional outdoor area. These stair balconies are accessible via the intermediate landing and are therefore at split level with the entrance balconies. The alternating left and right arrangement results in an airy and bright double-height space. Thus, a circulation system is created that is efficient, lets light through to the entrance balconies and the façades behind, and at the same time offers space for encounters.

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project

KKA-A093-AHW-2023

Location

Hamburg

Project Status

Exhibition

Year

2023

Co Curator

Kaye Geipel

Graphic Design

strobo B M

Communication

Bureau N

Site Administration

ephem Architekten

Structural Engineer

Bollinger & Grohman Ingenieure, Hamburg

Fire Safety Engineer

THAT, Hamburg

Colour Concept

Nobuko Watabiki

Construction

Messebau Siebold

For this exhibition on Hamburg’s architecture competitions of the recent years, we decided to make the huge wealth of the about 200 competitions – expressed in about 1.500 ideas and 6.000 plans – all together visible, instead of showing only selected competitions or competition entries. Not only the winning design of a competition is important, but each individual competition entry has a value in itself and contributes to the discussion about the future development of the city. Each work stands in relation to all the other works and is defined by others and vice versa. Together they allow for new readings and narratives that will shape the entire city.

Most competitions are submitted as printed plans – which we used as a medium to design the exhibition. In a spacious former warehouse, 1.100 banners (3m long and 90cm wide) were hung from the roof in long rows. Together, they build a hovering spatial body that we regard as a floating archive of ideas. The competitions printed on the banners are arranged by districts and within the district by chronological order. The competition entries are not shown with the winning projects first, but alphabetically according to the offices ‘names. This neutral order is reflected in a code that was given to each competition, each entry, each plan – representing the concept of an archive of ideas.

The plan of the floating archive shows the parallel rows of the banners crossed by wide and narrow paths. Along the wide paths, so-called islands are arranged, creating separate exhibitions spaces within the floating archive. Here the major tasks of the city planning are featured: Residential, Office/Commercial, Infrastructure, Public/Green Spaces, Culture/Education/Sport, Conversion/ Re-Use, and Urban Planning. Each island showing one of these themes has a unique geometrical shape and colour. The plan of the exhibition resembling a city is to visualise the importance of this first-time show of all competitions together as the sum of all contributions to the entire city

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news

KKA-N2023-10-BWE

Bauwelt has published an „Bauwelt Einblick“ issue about the exhibition “DIE GANZE STADT” that we curated with the architecture critic Kaye Geipel and designed, planned and executed. The special issue is very beautifully layouted with nice graphics and large photographs, interesting texts and interviews. Fifteen statements by various protagonists discuss the topic of competitions from different perspectives. It’s worth reading.

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project

KKA-A061-PKB-2019

Location

Berlin, Germany

Project Status

ongoing

Main Use

Exhibition/ Culture

Engineer (structure, construction physics, fire safety)

Bollinger + Grohmann

MEP engineer

Pi Berlin

Exhibition design

The Green Eyl

The completed L-shaped pavilions of the first construction phase of the western Karl-Marx-Alle show a strong differentiation between the side facing Karl-Marx-Allee and the side facing the neighbourhood street, both in terms of their façade design and floor plan. While a spacious, two-storey room faces Karl-Marx-Allee, the other side is characterised by a small-scale room layout as a serving part. Within the existing pavilions, only the pavilion on the corner of Schillingstraße (‘Camp4’) deviates from this principle of separating the two arms of the L into serving and serviced parts.

The new L-pavilions at the beginning of Karl-Marx-Allee represent a special situation. Due to the square situation in front of each pavilion in the direction of Alexanderplatz, these two pavilions have a showcase side on both legs of the L in terms of urban space. The two L-pavilions therefore have a two-storey space over the entire length of both legs of the L, with no functional separation between the two legs. The two special L-shaped pavilions thus create a typology that clearly marks the beginning of the series of different pavilions on Karl-Marx-Allee.

The exterior appearance of the L-pavilions is based on the realised pavilions of the first construction phase. The interior, on the other hand, is characterised by a visible wooden ceiling structure. The ceiling structure arranged at a 45° angle is intended to counteract a hierarchisation of the two arms of the L. Instead, the connection of the two legs emphasises the permeability of the corner and thus the urban significance at the beginning of Karl-Marx-Allee.

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project

KKA-A101-FBH-2024

Location

Hamburg

Project Status

Competition, 3rd prize

Main Use

Facade design

Year

2024

Area

1.400m²

Facade Engineer

Bollinger & Grohmann

The new façade of the Besenbinderhof is a clearly structured element façade. Prefabricated concrete elements are hung in a grid of 3.2 metres. Compared to the existing façade, the seemingly larger grid creates a visually generous impression. In between, ceramic elements cover the 1.6 metre grid of the existing building and give the new façade depth and rhythm. The width of the concrete elements decreases on the upper floors, gently zoning the overall façade into a base and an upper area.

The intersections of the vertical and horizontal elements are articulated, their surface texture stands out from the other elements. The interplay of the elements, their dimensions and arrangement create a new tectonic clarity. The stone slabs from the existing façade are removed and directly reused as high-quality floor and wall panelling for the new entrance hall. The resulting stone chippings are added to the new concrete façade as an aggregate. The new façade is thus reminiscent of its predecessor.

The new façade derives its decorative character primarily from the surface texture of the materials. It consists of concrete blocks coloured in a light brown-beige, whose formwork creates a roughly structured surface similar to embossing. However, the pattern by the formwork, which is always the same for economic reasons, is given an always different appearance by adding the stone chippings from the existing façade. A high-strength concrete is to be used, which allows significantly lower material thicknesses and thus material savings. It does not require reinforcement, which increases future recyclability.

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writings

KKW-W014-2024-HTCT

Wir umschreiben unser grundlegendes Entwurfsverständnis mit „How Things Come Together“. Erst in der Reaktion auf das komplexe Gefüge ihrer Gegebenheiten wird aus Planen und Bauen Architektur. Zu diesen Gegebenheiten zählen zunächst die üblicherweise als Kontext bezeichneten Bedingungen, die aus der physische Verortung eines Projekts in seiner (stadt-)räumlichen Umgebung entstehen. Wobei der Ort mit seinen städtebaulichen und atmosphärischen Gegebenheiten nicht nur physisch zu verstehen ist, der geschichtliche und zeitliche Kontext trägt zu spezifischen räumlichen Phänomenen und Kodierungen ebenso bei wie gesellschaftliche Aspekte. Soziologischer und kultureller Hintergrund wirken nicht nur auf Funktion, Programm und Nutzung ein. Tatsächliche Formgebung und Gestalt, Struktur und Ordnung, Dimension und Proportion wie auch alle phänomenologischen Charakteristiken eines Projekts entstehen aus dem Zusammenspiel dieser Gegebenheiten – wie die Dinge zusammenkommen.

Wir sehen die Welt, in der Architektur entsteht, als eine Sphäre dieser vielfältigen Gegebenheiten, die in wechselnder Bedeutung und Interrelation zueinander stehen. Sie spannt sich auf an den drei Polen der klassischen Trias aus Typos, Topos und Tektonik. Die Tektonik bildet dabei die offensichtlichste Formante der Architektur. Wie gebaut und konstruiert wird, welche Elemente und Materialien verwendet werden, wie die Teile physisch zusammengefügt werden ist der konstitutive Part der Architektur. Auch der Topos – griechisch für Ort oder Stelle – kann zunächst wörtlich verstanden werden: der konkrete Ort, an dem die Architektur entsteht, mit den ihm eigenen Faktoren aus Geografie, Klima, gebauter und gewachsener Umwelt. Der Typos wird allgemein im Zusammenhang mit der funktionstypischen Ausprägung erklärt und bezieht sich unter anderem auf Form und Gestalt, Komposition und Gliederung.

Viele Parameter auf der Sphäre der Gegebenheiten sind jedoch weniger offensichtlich, entstehen erst in der gemeinsamen Einwirkung der Pole, bzw. haben Einfluss auf deren Gewichtung, wie zum Beispiel kulturelle Aspekte oder gesellschaftliche Kodierungen. Die Wirkung ist wechselseitig, so dass die Gegebenheiten in ihrem Zusammenspiel den Kontext der Architektur bilden.

Genährt wird die Sphäre der Gegebenheiten durch eine zeitliche Atmosphäre. Geschichte und Zeitgeist, Brauch und Tradition, persönliches und kollektives Gedächtnis prägen die Lesart und Bedeutung der unterschiedlichen Parameter. Erst in der Antwort auf diese Gegebenheiten in ihrer projektspezifischen Gewichtung und wechselseitigen Korrelation entsteht Architektur – die wiederum auf das Gefüge einwirkt und dieses verändert.

Wir umschreiben unser grundlegendes Entwurfsverständnis mit „How Things Come Together“. Erst in der Reaktion auf das komplexe Gefüge ihrer Gegebenheiten wird aus Planen und Bauen Architektur. Zu diesen Gegebenheiten zählen zunächst die üblicherweise als Kontext bezeichneten Bedingungen, die aus der physische Verortung eines Projekts in seiner (stadt-)räumlichen Umgebung entstehen. Wobei der Ort mit seinen städtebaulichen und atmosphärischen Gegebenheiten...

project

KKA-A069-PPB-2019

Location

Planten un Blomen, Hamburg, Germany

Project Status

Built

Main Use

Folly

Year

2019

Structure

Paper, timber

Structural Engineer

Bollinger + Grohmann

Collaboration

Nobuko Watabiki (artist),
Rodenburg (paper specialist)

Carpenter

Michael Marx

Belvedere is built in Hamburg’s central park Planten un Blomen as part of the “Hamburger Architektur Sommer” (the Hamburg architecture triennial) and to mark the 30th anniversary of the city partnership between Hamburg and Osaka. Designed by KAWAHARA KRAUSE ARCHITECTS and with a colour concept by Japanese artist Nobuko Watabiki, the pavilion functions as an interaction of art and architecture and creates a quiet retreat in the fluid space of the vast park. As a public platform it invites visitors to enjoy and experience new perspectives of this popular and familiar park.

With the pavilion being a temporary structure of only four weeks, the possibility to disassemble it into its components played a big role in the design process as much as the choice of the construction materials. Developed as a reciprocal structure, the structural system consists of many small, easy to handle elements. Next to being easy to transport and assemble without the use of big machinery, this also allows for a simple construction on site. Only reversible joints (interlocking or screwing) were used in the pavilion as to guarantee the recyclability of the materials wood and paper after dismantling.

The roof structure is made of cardboard. On a single curved line, rectangular sheets were cut into two parts without wasting material: a convex and a concave part. By assembling the convex and concave parts in different directions in addition to the differing colours chosen by Nobuko Watabiki, this very rational roof structure now appears layered and multi-faceted. Depending on one’s viewpoint, the concave and convex elements seem to either align neatly, or interlock arbitrarily

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references

KKR-B1700-ED-KP

Year

Late 18th Century

Location

Okayama, JP

Architect

unknown

Taken in

January 2011

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project

KKA-A099-SVB-2023

Location

Bremen, Germany

Project Status

Invited competition

Main Use

Urban planning and restaurant

Landscape Architect

studio erde

Year

2023

The so-called Strandlust was a hotel and restaurant at the ferry terminal in Bremen Vegesack, regionally known for decades as a special place for celebrations and festivities. In the course of planning a new replacement building, the surrounding site was to be developed as a new residential area. Due to the direct location at the river Weser and the lack of flood protection, the area was to be designed on a terp level, while at the same time establishing good connections to the (not flood-protected) promenade in front of it.

On the level raised by the terp storey, the design for the new residential area features buildings as free-standing, slightly twisted volumes that form squares that widen and get narrow again. Thus the neighbourhood becomes open in all directions and permeable to walk through. The various views on the river between the buildings stage this special location. The design makes a clear distinction between the edge of the landscape as a retaining wall concealing the terp level, and the buildings, as such clearly reaching down to the lower level of the promenade.

The New Strandlust stands out from the neighbourhood as a prominent solitaire and will become a landmark on the Weser with its individual architectural language. Its round base storey protrudes distinctly from the retaining wall and forms a spacious terrace with a unique view above it. The building volume plays with strong geometric shapes that form another roof terrace, a cantilevering half-round volume providing shading to the terrace and a higher part of the building with inclining roof for good visibility even from a distance.

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academic

SKK-23SS-TUD-SMS-AIT

Location

AIT ArchitekturSalon Hamburg

Year

2023

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In an exhibition at AIT ArchitekturSalon in Hamburg we showed our teaching activities in a multifaceted “SAMMELSURIUM“ - a seemingly random collection of things taken out of their context. Everything within the design process from input to outcome is mixed here: observation and derivation, references, interpretation and narration as well as the various stages of finding and defining in the act of designing. Mixture and quantity allow for a constant change between focused and unconscious perception, creating new links and stimuli.

The exhibition reviewed one year teaching as visiting professors at TU Dresden, showing students’ designs for several sites in Hammerbrook (a part of Hamburg that recently undergoes enormous transformations from a monofunctional office area to a mixed urban quarter) as well as the exercises that accompanied the design course, small model studies and drawings of reference buildings.

For the opening of the exhibition, Jonathan Sergison (Sergison Bates architects) gave an extensive insight into his academic achievements in his lecture “The Practice of Teaching”. In short incentive lectures, Tobias Goevert (head of urban development department Hamburg) gave an overview of the development of Hammerbrook and Katja Pahl (Fritz-Schumacher-Gesellschaft e.V. Hamburg) introduced some models of Fritz Schumacher for the city of Hamburg, linking to the study models on show.

project

KKA-A077-RMC-2022

Location

Western France

Project Status

Built

Main Use

Residential

Year

2022

Structure

Wood

The remodeling of an old stone house in western France was to give the house a new order, make it more spacious inside, but at the same time preserve its unique character. Together with some lower annexes, this 1850 house forms a courtyard which serves as the entrance. To the rear of the house is the garden. The building ensemble is built in locally sourced stone, the main house has timber ceilings. Before the remodeling, the inside was divided into cellular, winding rooms with thin, non-load-bearing walls in contrast to the very thick, solid exterior walls.

All interior walls were removed. After the remodeling, the ground floor consists of only one large, open space. Shelves on the outer walls provide necessary storage space and underline the character of the room. The space is now characterized above all by the symmetry of the entrance door and the four windows either side of the courtyard and garden, as well as the presence of the solid stone exterior walls. Along the existing wooden staircase, a shelving unit protrudes into the room, creating an open zoning. Upstairs, built-in wardrobes and shelves form a new room structure.

The clients‘ wish for conservatories either side of the house was further developed into a spatial sequence. The first conservatory acts as a threshold and entrance between the courtyard and the now large, open living space, while the second represents the transition to the open garden. The two conservatories are characterized by a diagonal wooden grid, the structure of which was then adopted to form a pergola framing a „green room“ in the garden - a spatial counterpart to the courtyard on the other side of the house.

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writings

KKW-W006-2020-THR

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With all of its conflicts and possibilities, beauty and unsightliness, the city remains an expression of human coexistence. Its future viability is constantly being renegotiated — as it is in this exhibition on the theme of densification. Whereas the large-scale planning of infrastructure or open space is seen as the structural basis of dense coexistence, the theme of the threshold (an aspect of architecture) is not something that the urban planning take on densification focuses on.

Urban densification is conflict-prone, because it means intervening in existing districts, affecting neighbourhoods, ‘jostling people’ — and that means stress. It promotes anxiety, which leads to people defending their territory. The same space is shared by more people, the buildings become more compact, the apartments smaller, the houses higher, and the space between them narrower. Densification means just that: we will be living more closely together. That is another one of the many reasons why we need distance and yet, at the same time, want to create community.

However, densification should be seen not just as a loss of space, but rather as a potential boost to community, differentiation, and diversity in spatial experience. Architecture must therefore find conceptual answers to how the greater density can be qualified and balanced. The threshold, an interface between the private and public spheres, creates both proximity and distance between the individual and the community. It is a bond holding the denser city together and, at the same time, a buffer that resists that tie.

In the transition from outside to inside, from private to public, the threshold reconciles different functions or characteristics on several levels, mediating between city and house, between house and apartment, between community and individual. Its effect has strong social components that range from segregation to reinforcement of community. Thus, the threshold holds great potential for smooth-running urbanism, for diversity and intermingling, for coexistence and variety of lifestyle. The design value of the threshold is therefore of great significance, because its character and atmosphere profoundly shape the city and its architecture.

First and foremost, the term threshold designates a construction element in timber-framed buildings: specifically, the lower transverse beam of a door frame. This slightly raised cross-member demarcates the boundary between inside and outside, braces the door itself firmly into the frame, thereby giving the moveable element, the door, stability and support. It repels water and dirt from outside. And one must pause in the corridor and then step over it upon entering — a conscious process.

There are many different ways of creating a threshold: it can serve a range of purposes, from being a simple structural or spatial element, right up to structuring differentiated room sequences. The threshold can delimit a space or dissolve spatial boundaries into flowing transitions. And on top of that, it creates ambience, opens up expectations.

A repertoire of projects has been compiled for the exhibition to show how threshold spaces can be created and architecturally formulated. The almost infinitely expandable series of built and unbuilt examples — detached from their geographical, social, and historical contexts — forms a typological and conceptual pool that can be interpretatively applied in the context of the densified city: a pool that works in favour of a qualitatively rich city life.

[The text was written in collaboration with Hilde Léon and published in the catologue of the exhibition “Urbainable – Positions on the European City for the 21st Centure” at Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2020]

With all of its conflicts and possibilities, beauty and unsightliness, the city remains an expression of human coexistence. Its future viability is constantly being renegotiated — as it is in this exhibition on the theme of densification. Whereas the large-scale planning of infrastructure or open space is seen as the structural basis of dense coexistence, the theme of the threshold (an aspect of architecture) is not something that the urban planning take on densification focuses on. Urban densification is conflict-prone, because it means...

project

KKA-A081-ADK-2020

Location

Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Germany

Main Use

Exhibition

Project Status

Built

Year

2020

Cooperation

Prof. Hilde Léon

In the transition from outside to inside, from private to public, the threshold reconciles different functions or characteristics on several levels, ediating between city and house,between house and apartment, between community and individual. Commonly known reference projects from across the newer architectural history were chosen for the exhibition regardless of their typology or size, aiming to set a new focus onto the familiar to discover meaning and potential of threshold spaces. With the help of models the spatial phenomena of thresholds is explored in a playful serial examination.

Each architecture holds many thresholds and threshold spaces. They can be found in various scales. At the same time their morphology can easily be transferred into different scales. Therefore the scale does not play a role in the exhibited models. The projects were rather adjusted in their proportions and extracted area to a unitary absolute size instead of a relative one, in favour of a universal validity. Like in a test tube where substances are seen in a new light, a cube of 10x10x10cm serves as a frame of observation. In this imaginary test tube the interpretative reconstruction of the fragments is condensed to morphological diagrams of possible variations of thresholds.

Like a cabinet of wonder, the medley of objects taken out of context offers a repertoire of inspiration and curiosity. The model table with its endless rows of spatial diagrams aims to feed the imagination of how our living together in the city may be changed by threshold spaces without providing a solution to a concrete situation. How would the city, the house, our community change if the threshold spaces were to be applied more consciously?

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academic

SKK-22WS-TUD-AwR-BKLT

Location

TU Dresden

Year

Winter semester 2022-2023

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Just as redundancy in communication takes place in a certain field of reference and changes its justification in another field of reference, redundancy in architecture means for us an investigation of the relationships of the part to the whole in different reference systems. We do not think of redundancy in the general linguistic sense of something superfluous, but rather see architecture with redundancy as an opportunity to reduce definitions in favour of an expansion of possibilities.

In architecture with redundancy, we want to rethink the question of how much needs to be defined. A space that is designed for the fixed scenario of a specific programme adapts poorly to additions or changes. At the same time, function is a rather short-term aspect of a building compared to other components such as the load-bearing structure. In this sense, scenario-defining architecture neither welcomes a future yet unknown, nor does it provide an answer to the changes already taking place in the present.

A space that is not strictly defined, but encourages different uses, allows for different interpretations under different conditions and in this sense is sustainable in a broad spectrum of meanings. Despite the omission of certain parts or definitions, architecture with redundancy harbours the potential for stimuli. Instead of narrow specifications, architecture with redundancy pursues the goal of stimulation.

references

KKR-B1929-LMvdR-BP

Year

1929

Location

Barcelona, ES

Architect

Mies van der Rohe

Taken in

June 2015 and September 2019

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writings

KKW-W007-2020-FaO

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ふたつの「あたり前」と寛容な調整

Difference between obviousness and familiarity and its liberal adjustment

生まれてから僕たちはたくさんの「あたり前」を学びながら大きくなります。しかし「あたり前」だと思っているそれらひとつひとつについて、それは自明だから「あたり前」なのか、ただ慣れ親しんでいるから「あたり前」なのか、そのあたりの区別に考えを巡らせる機会がどれくらいあるでしょうか。さらに大学で専門的な学習を始めると、たくさんのことを学び、それに慣れ親しむなかで、学んだ内容がいつしか「あたり前」と化し、さらにはその「あたり前」を概念(notion)に変換して蓄積していくことで、会話や議論がコンパクトにできるようになります。(たとえば、モダニズムという概念を使って議論ができる人よりも、モダニズムという概念自身を説明できる人は圧倒的に少ない)。

慣れ親しんで「あたり前」と化した概念群は、時として思考に慣性を与えてします。乗っている電車のなかで引っ張られたりつんのめったりする、あの慣性の法則の慣性です。思考もまた同じように、ひとたび走り出すとそこに潜む「慣れ」の持つ推進力が半ば自動的に思考を展開させてしまう経験は誰にでもあると思います。その慣性力に流されないように、ぐっと踏ん張り、「あたり前」だと思っている概念を、もう一度センテンスとして説明的に開いてみることはとても有効で、ぼくは大学で向き合う生徒にもよく求めます。

それは自明(obvious)だからあたり前なのか、慣れ親しんでいる(familiar)からあたり前なのか、それを軸に身の回りを眺めると、そのとき視界の彼方に、あり得るかもしれない景色が浮かんでくることもあるかもしれません。そしておそらくだけれど、大抵のことはobviousだからあたり前なんじゃなく、ただただfamiliarなだけなんじゃないかとも思います。そうすると、その慣れ親しんだあたり前を更新するきっかけとして建築を構想できないかという態度が思いつきます。それは建築計画から、建築生産、構法と工法、はたまた社会的、政治的なものまで建築にまつわるさまざま層においてです。

このとき、(a)ひとりの設計者、あるいは同時代の設計者群の理性が革新的にそれを更新していこうとする態度(あるいは潮流)と、(b)伝統や慣習の中に埋め込まれた先達の知恵としてのfamiliarityをひとまず受け入れ、しかしそれを精査しながら寛容に微調整していこうとする態度が思いつきます。(もちろんこのふたつだけではないけれど)大雑把に言って、日本では(a)の革新的態度による新しさ(novelty)の追求の傾向が、ドイツやスイスでは(b)の保守的態度による「新しい古さ(oldnew)」の追求の傾向が現在目につきやすいように思います。

(b)のベースとなるのは、昔に戻れという復古的まなざしではないので、リヴァイヴァル(revival)じゃなくてリヴァイズ(revise)。ただその調整や更新は急激にではなく、徐々にかつ寛容に、あたかも永遠の過渡期を生きるかのように行われます。そこでは白黒をはっきりさせるのではなく、たとえばヴェンチューリのいうようにグレーを愛し、しかもそのグレーの無限の階調を探求する態度とも言えます。そしてよい建築においては往々にして、その調整によってずらされた部分がウィットに富み、調整後の現在だけでなく、過去の文脈をもより際立たせるように思います。

ぼくは、(a)の環境で教育を受け、建築を学び、(b)の環境で実務と教育に携わっていることになり、身をもってそのふたつを相対化する機会に恵まれています。疑いもしなかった「あたり前」を紐解いていく中で、革新的な提案を模索する一方、歴史と伝統を調停者として迎え入れ、寛容な調整を通して、伝統そのものを新しくアップデートしていくことで、過去の意味や現れ方さえも変えられるんだ(あるいは変えてしまうんだ)ということを、日々生徒とともに学び、また自分でも実践しています。

生まれてから僕たちはたくさんの「あたり前」を学びながら大きくなります。しかし「あたり前」だと思っているそれらひとつひとつについて、それは自明だから「あたり前」なのか、ただ慣れ親しんでいるから「あたり前」なのか、そのあたりの区別に考えを巡らせる機会がどれくらいあるでしょうか。さらに大学で専門的な学習を始めると、たくさんのことを学び、それに慣れ親しむなかで...

references

KKA-LIB

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H. Arendt, The Human Condition

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P. Auster, Moon Palace

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G. Bateson, Redundancy and Coding

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W. Benjamin, Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit

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I. Calvino, Six Memos for the next Millennium

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T. S. Eliot, Tradition and the individual Talent

project

KKA-A043-OBR-2015

Location

Rheine, Germany

Project Status

Schematic design; awarded with the Encouraging Prize SD Review 2015

Main Use

Open Library

Year

2015

Floor Area

120m²

Structure

Timber

“Alter Friedhof” in Rheine is a former cemetery that is now used as a park. An open library was planned to encourage the use of this park with its huge, old trees. To the people from the neighbourhood it is an opportunity to exchange books. In contrast to the open book cabinets that have recently become very popular in German cities, it is designed not only to provide a place for exchanging books but also an open library inviting people to read the books on site and thus adding a new function to the park.

The building nestles at the foot of the old trees, its contour and volume are defined by the open spaces between the trees. The open library is a truly open building. The soil remains visible within the building and the open structure makes it accessible from all sides. However, the low reaching roof provides shelter from the rain and the wind, creating an intimate and protected space.
The inside of the open library is arranged around three big “book shelves” embracing three courtyards and drenching the introverted space with plenty of light.

The shelves also have a structural use. A single structural system was developed for the walls and the roof of the building: short and therefore economic timber planks are arranged in a windmill layout forming a continuous grid structure doubling up in the walls, thus creating book shelves. The roof is covered with oversized wooden shingles, its overlaps leaving small slits that allow the light to fall inside

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project

KKA-A026-WHW-2013

Location

Leonberg, Germany

Project Status

Built

Main Use

Contemplation

Year

2013

Structure

Timber

Carpenter

Bartholomaeus, Leonberg

The starting points for this project were two completely independent circumstances. One was a heap of firewood in the client's garden that needed a place to be stacked and dried. The other was the wish of the religious clients for a place of contemplation and prayer in their house. The design for the wooden hut combines these two different wishes. It is a small private chapel in the clients' garden that is built of firewood.

The hut consists of five wooden frames that are stacked with firewood, thus forming the outer walls. The comfortably dim space inside is spotted by countless rays of light sparkling through the logs. In the course of time, dried wood is being used and replaced by new wood resulting in a constant change in the walls of the hut. The stacking pattern changes as well as the colour of the wood.

The space is created by only two walls. They open up towards the entrance and narrow the space towards the cross thus directing the movement to the inside. The deep roof shades the space underneath while the wind passes through the hut in summer. By using the on site firewood in the garden and granting it a new use, an unusual space emerges just a few steps outside the house providing a shelter for contemplation and prayer away from daily life.

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project

KKA-A018-ASH12-2012

Location

Hamburg, Germany

Project Status

Installation

Main Use

Exhibition

Year

2012

Collaboration

Nobuko Watabiki (artist)

“Line, surface, space“ is an installation that plays with the perception of space. A fragile structure of threads stretching from floor to ceiling seems to dissolve in space and recompose to ever new appearances. Varying between transparent and closed surfaces, the spatial perception changes with each step taken through the installation. It is erected on the plan of three interlocking twisted squares of different sizes. While the threads of the outer square suggest the edges of an imaginary space, the more denselyarranged threads towards the middle seem to create surfaces. Ordinary threads evolve into lines in space that create surfaces which seem to comprise spaces. Lines and surfaces overlap in various constellations in space. Thus a fragile structure evolves on the plan of the three squares that constantly changes its appearance on approaching, walking around or through it, creating ever new impressions.

The structure blurs the thresholds between line, surface and space. It offers a new perception of these three ideas and a new understanding of how much needs to be defined in order to make them perceivable. Impressions when moving through the installation are complex; the ambiguous overlapping of the threads - as single elements hardly visible - seems to make the space even more perceivable though.

Financial restrictions encourage us to question essential principles that are usually taken for granted and see them as opportunities to develop a new architecture. In the installation “line, surface, space“ new spatial experiences are created by providing ordinary woollen threads with a new use. The Japanese artist Nobuko Watabiki painted some of the threads, so that colourful areas materialize on the surfaces by the interaction of the threads. Painted areas overlap and keep on changing their composition as one progresses through the installation, affecting transparency and perception of the surfaces and the space.

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